Leftover Risotto Frittata

Last night I served a risotto with mushrooms, roasted tomatoes, and pecorino tartufo, and the kids looked at me like I served them a death sentence. As I was wrapping up the leftovers, my husband asked, "Does risotto even keep well?" "Not really," I said, but I put it in the fridge anyway... well, today I had an inspiration, and like most of my inspirations it has been done before... FRITTATA! I just barely heated some red, orange and yellow bell pepper strips so that they retained their crunch, threw a few pieces of diced Canadian bacon into the skillet, added a scoop of the leftover risotto to heat it through, and then whipped up a couple of eggs to add to the mix, topped it all with some Anglesey sea salt, and had a lunch to die for. I am not blogging this as a recipe because you could use just about any ingredient your heart desires. Fear not the leftover risotto... :)


Lamb Tagine

Apparently my cooking is driven lately by food envy. Take my previous post about pancit and lumpit as an example. Food so unique and desirable that it warrants a special delivery and special mention? Well, I'll have what she's having! Tonight's dish is inspired by the occasional evening drop-in on my neighbors across the street who lived in Egypt for several years and quite frequently cook Middle Eastern cuisine. Whenever I come into their house and smell something delicious cooking for dinner and I ask what the wonderful smell is, it seems that at least half of the time the answer is "tagine". Well, I want *my* house to smell delicious, too!

If you want YOUR house to smell delicious, then this is what you do:


  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 2 pounds lamb meat, cut into 1 1/2 inch cubes
  • 2 teaspoons paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 pinch saffron
  • 3/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 2 medium onions, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 5 carrots, peeled, cut into fourths, then sliced lengthwise into thin strips
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger
  • 1 lemon, zested
  • 1 (14.5 ounce) can homemade chicken broth or low-sodium canned broth
  • 1 tablespoon sun-dried tomato paste
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon water (optional)


Place cubed lamb in a bowl, toss with 2 tablespoons of the olive oil, and set aside. Combine the paprika, turmeric, cumin, cayenne, cinnamon, cloves, cardamom, salt, ginger, saffron, garlic powder, and coriander; mix well. Add to the lamb in the bowl, and toss around to coat well. Cover and refrigerate at least 8 hours, preferably overnight.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a large, heavy bottomed pot over medium-high heat. Add the lamb in batches, and brown well. Remove to a plate.

Add onions and carrots to the pot and cook for 5 minutes. Stir in the fresh garlic and ginger; continue cooking for an additional 5 minutes.

Return the lamb to the pot and stir in the lemon zest, chicken broth, tomato paste, and honey. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer for 1 1/2 to 2 hours, stirring occasionally, until the meat is tender. If the consistency of the tagine is too thin, you may thicken it with a mixture of cornstarch and water during the last 5 minutes.

Serve over warm couscous.

Pancit and Lumpia

A while back my stepmother posted on Facebook that she was so excited because a friend was bringing her some pancit and lumpia. Say what? I had never heard those word before, and they sounded so strange to me! Well naturally my curiosity led me to search those words on Google, and I found that they are quite tasty sounding foods traditional to the Philippines. I don't know why it took me so long to actually get around to making them, but it was inevitable as I just kept thinking about them! So, last night I took the plunge and found some recipes online at allrecipes.com.

Quick and Easy Pancit


  • 1 (12 ounce) package dried rice noodles
  • 1 teaspoon vegetable oil
  • 1 onion, finely diced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 cups diced cooked chicken breast meat
  • 1 small head cabbage, thinly sliced
  • 4 carrot, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 2 lemons - cut into wedges, for garnish


Place the rice noodles in a large bowl, and cover with warm water. When soft, drain, and set aside.

Heat oil in a wok or large skillet over medium heat. Saute onion and garlic until soft. Stir in chicken cabbage, carrots and soy sauce. Cook until cabbage begins to soften. Toss in noodles, and cook until heated through, stirring constantly. Transfer pancit to a serving dish and garnish with quartered lemons.

Filipino Lumpia
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 pound ground pork
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup minced carrots
1/2 cup chopped green onions
1/2 cup thinly sliced green cabbage
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon soy sauce
30 lumpia wrappers
2 cups vegetable oil for frying

1.Place a wok or large skillet over high heat, and pour in 1 tablespoon vegetable oil. Cook pork, stirring frequently, until no pink is showing. Remove pork from pan and set aside. Drain grease from pan, leaving a thin coating. Cook garlic and onion in the same pan for 2 minutes. Stir in the cooked pork, carrots, green onions, and cabbage. Season with pepper, salt, garlic powder, and soy sauce. Remove from heat, and set aside until cool enough to handle.

2.Place three heaping tablespoons of the filling diagonally near one corner of each wrapper, leaving a 1 1/2 inch space at both ends. Fold the side along the length of the filling over the filling, tuck in both ends, and roll neatly. Keep the roll tight as you assemble. Moisten the other side of the wrapper with water to seal the edge.

3.Heat a heavy skillet over medium heat, add oil to 1/2 inch depth, and heat for 5 minutes. Slide 3 or 4 lumpia into the oil. Fry the rolls for 1 to 2 minutes, until all sides are golden brown. Drain on paper towels. Serve immediately.

(side note: my interpretation of "3 or 4" is "however many fit in the pan at once without overcrowding.")